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From One Parent of a Child With Cancer to Another

This is a letter I am writing from myself as one parent of a child with cancer to another parent of a child with cancer. This letter is not meant to scare anyone, but instead hopes the parent's transition into this new life of having a child with cancer will be a little bit easier. Read more here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jay-scott/from-one-parent-of-a-chil_b_8431882.html

Advocating for Your Child: How much is too much?

When you are in the heat of the battle fighting for the life of your child, nothing at the time feels as though it is over the line. Hindsight, so I have heard, is 20/20. But then again, having your child die from cancer and feeling as though you stopped short of trying everything in your power lasts forever. Somewhere along the continuum, there is a balance that exists. Read more here: https://cancerkn.com/advocating-for-your-child-how-much-is-too-much/

New finding offers clues for blocking cancer gene

A new study suggests a potential new way to block one of the most common cancer-causing genes, without causing severe side effects. Read more here: http://www.uofmhealth.org/news/archive/201510/new-finding-offers-clues-blocking-cancer-gene

Inherited gene variation linked to an increased risk of the most common childhood cancer

Researchers studying two generations of a family affected by pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have identified an inherited variation in the ETV6 gene that is associated with an increased risk of developing the disease. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators led the study, which appears in the October 28 issue of the journal Lancet Oncology. Read more here: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-10-inherited-gene-variation-linked-common.html

Looking for parents to start new parent support group in Markham

Attention City of Markham residents! If there are any parents interested in starting a community-based parent support group for families of children with cancer in Markham, we now have a meeting space secured there for monthly meetings thanks to our friends at the Cancer Recovery Foundation of Canada (http://cancerrecovery.ca/)! Together, we will provide you with the support that you need to start your own group. Please email us at info@opacc.org for more information if you are interested! Feel free to share this and help spread the word.

New hope for the 20 percent of kids who don't respond to standard cancer treatment

A new drug combination being trialled in a groundbreaking CHU Sainte-Justine/University of Montreal study is giving hope for survival, healing and improved quality of life to the 20% of children who do not respond to standard cancer treatments. Read more here: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-10-percent-kids-dont-standard-cancer.html

Research suggests canine companionship helps calm children undergoing cancer treatment

Many hospitals have therapy dogs who visit with patients, and anecdotal evidence underscores the positive impact these programs have on children with cancer and their families. Preliminary findings from a new, multi-center trial provides some of the first quantitative data to validate these claims. Read more here: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-10-canine-companionship-calm-children-cancer.html

UAMS Cancer Researchers Publish Findings on Rare Childhood Leukemia

New findings on juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) by researchers at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) and collaborators at other institutions were published online Oct. 12 by the medical journal Nature Genetics. Read more here: http://www.newswise.com/articles/uams-cancer-researchers-publish-findings-on-rare-childhood-leukemia

The Connection Between Cancer Treatment and Cardiac Problems

As more people survive cancer, doctors are discovering the long-term side-effects of their treatments. Read more here: http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2015/10/20/heceptin-and-the-connection-between-cancer-treatments-and-cardiac-problems

Keep finances healthy when confronting a serious medical issue

At a time when great strides are being made in the fight against most forms of pediatric cancer, a new study shows that one of the lingering, mostly undiscussed side effects of treatment is financial consequences that can last a lifetime, regardless of the outcome of any treatment. Read more here: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/keep-finances-healthy-when-confronting-a-serious-medical-issue-2015-10-18

Young Cancer Survivors May Require Lifelong Screenings

Teen and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk for other cancers later in life, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer. Read more here: http://www.oncologynurseadvisor.com/daily-oncology-news/young-cancer-survivors-may-require-lifelong-screenings/article/444038/

The No Man's Land of Teen Cancer

Teens with cancer fall into a nebulous space between childhood and young adulthood, and they tend to suffer the most for this. A study by the American Childhood Cancer Organization reports that about one third of adolescent cancer patients aged 15-19 are seen in pediatric cancer centers, while the remaining patients are seen in an adult cancer facility. Read more here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jacqueline-dooley/the-no-mans-land-of-teen_b_8276696.html

Computer training may improve memory for childhood cancer survivors

Children who receive cancer treatments may suffer thinking problems later, but using an at-home computer training program can help reduce these deficits, according to a new study. Read more here: http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/10/12/us-health-childhoodcancer-cognition-idUSKCN0S623F20151012

We Are Astonishingly Good At Curing Childhood Cancer. Why?

Treatment for cancer has increased dramatically since the 1950s, and nowhere is that more evident than in pediatric oncology; of the thousands of children treated in the U.S. for cancer every year, 80 percent of them will go into remission and go on to live productive lives—significantly higher than the five-year survival numbers for general oncology, which are 63 percent chance of survival for female patients and 66 percent for men. Read more here: http://www.popsci.com/we-are-astonishingly-good-at-curing-childhood-cancer-why

Discovery led by MSU professor finds two common medicines can fight childhood cancer

Dr. Bachmann, who has a history of finding new uses for old drugs, found in his research that a combination of the drugs DFMO or difluoromethylornithine and sulfasalazine can be used to stop the growth of neuroblastoma, which causes about 15 percent of all deaths from childhood cancer. Read more here: http://statenews.com/article/2015/10/msu-professor-discovers-cancer-fighting-medicines

Benzene in traffic emissions tied to childhood leukemia

(Reuters Health) - Traffic pollution near the home – and specifically, benzene in the air - increases the risk of one type of childhood leukemia, according to a nationwide study in France. Read more here: http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/10/06/us-health-airpollution-kids-leukemia-idUSKCN0S02Q520151006

Children's cancer treatment takes financial toll on families

The study found that about one-quarter of families of children being treated for cancer lost more than 40 percent of their total household income, while one-third experienced housing, energy or food insecurity. Read more here: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/childrens-cancer-treatment-takes-financial-toll-on-families/

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