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Holidays, Happiness and Heartbreak

Every person's grief is unique. How you choose to honor the passing of a loved one is up to you. If I could say one thing to others dealing with loss in the midst of these festive times, it would be this: Give yourself permission to live through the holidays however you need to. Create your own traditions. Take comfort wherever you find it. Remember the good times. Read more here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/pat-taylor/holidays-happiness-heartb_b_8809396.html?platform=hootsuite

Battle Scars

Maya Stern is a 26 year old long-term cancer survivor. Dealing with people's often inappropriate comments about her scars has been something Maya has learned how to deal with gracefully...and with more than a little patience. Read more here: https://cancerkn.com/battle-scars/?platform=hootsuite

UK scientists develop new method to diagnose and monitor rare childhood cancer

In research part-funded by Cancer Research UK, scientists at the University of Cambridge have developed what they hope could provide an alternative to taking tissue samples (biopsies) to diagnose and monitor a rare type of cancer, known as germ cell cancer, in children. Read more here: http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-us/cancer-news/news-report/2015-12-16-uk-scientists-develop-new-method-to-diagnose-and-monitor-rare-childhood-cancer#.VnRTsLzvFkE.twitter

Promising new results from immunotherapy

After about five years of testing in humans, an experimental cell therapy that boosts the immune system continues to produce long remissions in many patients with a variety of advanced blood cancers, says a team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/healthcare/Penn-CHOP--Promising-new-results-from-immunotherapy.html#AXdQMvWaZGCf8c8g.99

Personalized strategies critical for childhood cancer

Genomic tools are helping to guide the search for new insights into uncommon childhood cancers like pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and lymphomas — insights that, researchers hope, will improve survival rates and better spare survivors of childhood cancers from long-term treatment-associated health effects in adulthood. Read more here: http://managedhealthcareexecutive.modernmedicine.com/managed-healthcare-executive/news/personalized-strategies-critical-childhood-cancer

Children with childhood leukemia benefit from prophylactic antibiotics

Prophylactic antibiotics significantly reduce the risk of serious bacterial infections in children during the critical first month of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer, according to a U.S. and Canadian study led by investigators from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. Read more here: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-12/dci-cwc120315.php

Genetic variants tied to increased risk of bone complications in young leukemia patients

Research led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has identified genetic variations in young leukemia patients that are associated with an increased incidence of osteonecrosis, a serious cancer treatment side effect. Read more here: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/genetic-variants-tied-to-increased-risk-of-bone-complications-in-young-leukemia-patients-300188437.html

The End of Pediatric Cancer Research as We Know It

It's time for 'the pediatric cancer research machine' to help childhood cancer survivors thrive. Read more here: http://health.usnews.com/health-news/patient-advice/articles/2015/12/02/the-end-of-pediatric-cancer-research-as-we-know-it

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