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Altered immune cells clear childhood brain tumor in mice

Engineered human immune cells can vanquish a deadly pediatric brain tumor in a mouse model, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has demonstrated. Read more: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180416121624.htm

Study Uncovers New Childhood Leukemia Predisposition Gene

Germline variants in the IKZF1 gene can increase the risk for familial and sporadic childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to new research by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and collaborators. Read more: https://www.genomeweb.com/cancer/study-uncovers-new-childhood-leukemia-predisposition-gene#.WuNYQZch2M_

Single-cell study in a childhood brain tumor affirms the importance of context

In defining the cellular context of diffuse midline gliomas, researchers find the cells fueling their growth and suggest a potential approach to treating them: forcing their cells to be more mature. Read more: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-04-single-cell-childhood-brain-tumor-affirms.html

Larotrectinib shows promise in paediatric patients with TRK gene mutations

A new cancer drug has proven safe and effective for pediatric patients with a rare tumour gene mutation. The study tested the safety and dose of larotrectinib (LOXO-195) in paediatric patients with a mutation known as tropomyosin receptor kinases (TRK) that can occur in a variety of tumour types. Read more: https://www.europeanpharmaceuticalreview.com/news/74260/larotrectinib-trk-gene-mutations/

Neurological Side Effects of Childhood Leukemia Treatment

More children than ever before are surviving cancer for decades after their original diagnosis. However, survivors can experience long-term health effects from treatment, with the Canadian Cancer Society saying that two-thirds of children will develop one or more of these chronic or long-term conditions. Read more: https://cancerkn.com/neurological-side-effects-childhood-leukemia-treatment/

More than 70% of childhood cancer survivors develop hypertension by age 50 years

Childhood cancer survivors appeared more likely to develop hypertension during adulthood than the general population, according to study results. Read more: https://www.healio.com/hematology-oncology/pediatric-oncology/news/online/%7B9eb15e54-f9f3-4e7d-9a23-e7a7cbc4b33f%7D/more-than-70-of-childhood-cancer-survivors-develop-hypertension-by-age-50-years

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